BIOMETRIC EVALUATION &

ASSESSMENT TOOLS

INITIAL BASELINE ASSESSMENT AND POST PROGRAM EVALUATION

Our programming is reviewed by a PhD with a specialization in qualitative research methodologies, qualitative comparative analysis, evaluation, case studies, site visits, and performing content analysis.

Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

GLOBAL PHYSICAL HEALTH SCORE

GLOBAL MENTAL HEALTH SCORE

The Common Fund’s Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) program created new paradigms for how clinical research information is collected, used, and reported. PROMIS addressed a need in the clinical research community for a rigorously tested patient reported outcome (PRO) measurement tool that uses recent advances in information technology, psychometrics, and qualitative, cognitive, and health survey research to measure PROs such as pain, fatigue, physical functioning, emotional distress, and social role participation that have a major impact on quality-of-life across a variety of chronic diseases.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=98&v=Nzwo58i0PhU

https://commonfund.nih.gov/promis/index

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DV-V2s8uy3I

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE MEDICAL SYMPTOMS QUESTIONNAIRE SCORE

Reference IFM Tool Kit: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1zg4MzL112tKkors_27ezmfznSlKvw2ta?usp=sharing

Identifies and Scores Factors for Chronic Illness, Pain, Heart Disease, Diabetes and Cancer, and Inflammatory Markers

Physiology and Function: Organizing the Patient’s Clinical Imbalances

Scores and tracks imbalances in:

  • Defense and Repair (e.g., Immune, Inflammation, Infection/Microbiota)

  • Energy (e.g., Energy Regulation, Mitochondrial Function)

  • Biotransformation and Elimination e.g., Toxicity, Detoxification)

  • Transport (e.g., Cardiovascular, Lymphatic System)

  • Energy (e.g., Energy Regulation, Mitochondrial Function)

  • Communication (e.g., Endocrine, Neurotransmitters, Immune messengers)

  • Structural Integrity (e.g., from Subcellular Membranes to Musculoskeletal Structure)

  • Assimilation (e.g., Digestion, Absorption, Microbiota /GI, Respiration)

  • Mental (e.g., cognitive function, perceptual patterns)

  • Emotional (e.g., emotional regulation, grief, sadness, anger, etc.)

  • Spiritual (e.g., meaning and purpose, relationship with something greater)

 

Modifiable Personal Lifestyle Factors

  • Sleep & Relaxation

  • Exercise & Movement

  • Nutrition

  • Stress

  • Relationships

 

Retelling the Patient’s Story

  • Antecedents (Predisposing Factors-Genetic/ Environmental)

  • Triggering Events (Activators)

  • Mediators / Perpetuators (Contributors)

BODY COMPOSITION

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2082845/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2894716/

 

BODY MASS INDEX (BMI)

https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/adult_bmi/index.html

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmicalc.htm

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmi_tbl.htm

 

BLOOD PRESSURE

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/high-blood-pressure

https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/measure.htm

 

RESTING HEART RATE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0024325/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4754196/

 

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE TOXIC EXPOSURE QUESTIONNAIRE        

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE SELF CARE QUESTIONNAIRE

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE SLEEP QUESTIONNAIRE

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE MOVEMENT JOURNAL

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE MINDFULNESS JOURNAL

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE DAILY ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE

Reference IFM Tool Kit https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1zg4MzL112tKkors_27ezmfznSlKvw2ta?usp=sharing

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE TBI ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/mtbi-symptom-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Total = 13-59 Low Self-Efficacy Total = 60 -114 Moderate Self-Efficacy Total = 115 - 130 High Self-Efficacy

 

Reference: Cicerone K.D., Azulay J. (2007). Perceived self-efficacy and life satisfaction after traumatic brain injury. J. Head Trauma Rehabil. 22, 257-266 Scale Description: The Self-Efficacy for Symptom Management Scale is a 13-item scale to assess the ability of patients to manage common challenges associated with TBI.

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE PTSD ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/post-traumatic-stress-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Total = 17-33 Low PTS Total = 34-43 Moderate PTS Total = 44-85 High PTS

 

Source: The items come from the 17-item PCL-M. Public Domain Reference: Kimerling, R. (2009). Examining the diagnostic and clinical utility of the PTSD Checklist. HSR&D Study: SHP-169. United States Department of Veteran Affairs. Blanchard, E. B., Jones-Alexander, J., Buckley, T. C., & Forneris, C. A. (1996). Psychometric properties of the PTSD checklist (PCL). Behavioral Research & Therapy, 34, 669-673.

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE DEPRESSION ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/depression-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Anyone who endorses Question #9 (Self Harm) greater than 0 should be followed up immediately. If Total score falls in range 0-4 Low Acuity If Total score falls in range 5-15 Moderate Acuity If Total score falls in range 16-27 High Acuity

 

Reference: Kroenke K., Spitzer R.L., & Williams J.B. (2001). The PHQ-9: validity of a brief depression severity measure. J. of Gen Intern Med, 16, 606-613 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11556941

 

Scale Description: The scale is the 9-item subset of the Patient Health Questionnaire asking about symptoms of major depression. Developed by Pfizer, Inc.

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE ANXIETY ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/anxiety-assessment.pdf

 

Scoring Algorithm

Low Anxiety Symptoms = 0 to 5

Moderate Anxiety Symptoms = 6 to 10 l

High Anxiety Symptoms = 11 to 21

 

Scale Description: The GAD-7 is a subset of the full PHQ. It has been shown to identify generalized anxiety disorder.

 

References: Spitzer R.L., Kroenke K., Williams J.B.W., & Lowe, B. (2006). The GAD -7 A brief measure of assessing generalized anxiety disorder. Arch of Intern Med, 166, 1092-1097

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE CAREGIVER STRESS ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/caregiver-stress-assessment.pdf

 

Reference: Epstein-Lubow G., Gaudiano B.A., Hinckley M, Salloway S., & Miller I.W. (2010) Evidence for the validity of the American Medical Association’s caregiver self-assessment questionnaire as a screening measure for depression. J. of the Amer. Geriatrics Soc., 58, 387-88 http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/physician-resources/public-health/promoting-healthy-lifestyles/geriatrichealth/caregiver-health/caregiver-self-assessment.shtml

 

Scale Description: Developed by the American Medical Association, the Caregiver Self-Assessment Questionnaire uses 18 items to identify an at-risk population of individuals who are feeling overwhelmed by caretaking demands.

 

Note: For each assessment, there is an algorithm leading to one of three acuity ranges, Low, Moderate, or High.

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE RESILIENCY ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/resilience-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Total = 71 – 88 High Resilience Total = 50 – 70 Moderate Resilience Total = 0 – 49 Low Resilience

 

Source: The items are from the 22-item Responses to Stressful Experiences Scale (RSES) Public Domain Reference: Johnson, D. C., Polusny, M .A., Erbes, C. R., King, D., King, L., Litz, B. T., Schnurr, P., Friedman, M. & Southwick, S. M. (2008). Resilience and Response to Stress: Development and Initial Validation of the Response to Stressful Experiences Scale (RSES). Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Marine Corps Combat and Operational Stress Control (MCCOSC) Conference, San Diego, CA.

 

Scale Description: The RSES is a 22-item scale emphasizing coping processes. It was developed by the NC-PTSD and was validated using active duty and reserve component military samples (N = 1059)

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/perceived-social-support-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Total = 69-84 High Acuity Total = 49-68 Moderate Acuity Total = 12-48 Low Acuity

 

Reference: Zimet, G.D., Powell, S.S., Farley, G.K., Werkman, S. & Berkoff, K.A. (1990). Psychometric characteristics of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Journal of Personality Assessment, 55, 610-17. Zimet, G.D., Dahlem, N.W., Zimet, S.G. & Farley, G.K. (1988). The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Journal of Personality Assessment, 52, 30-41. Scale Description: A 12-item scale of perceived social support from family and friends. Does not refer to deployment.

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE SATISFACTION WITH LIFE SCALE

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/satisfaction-life-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Total = 30-35 High Life Satisfaction Total = 18-29 Moderate Life Satisfaction Feedback Total = 5-17 Low Life Satisfaction

 

Reference: Diener, E., Emmons, R.A., Larsen, R.J., & Griffin, S. (1985). The Satisfaction with Life Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment, 49, 71-75.

Scale Description: The Satisfaction with Life Scale is a 5-item scale that measures general satisfaction with life. Scoring and Algorithm


NUTRITION JOURNAL

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4684110/

 

MICHIGAN PAIN SCALE

http://compass.rehab/sites/default/files/uploads/MPMS_6_13_12_Version.pdf

 

DEFENSE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE PHYSICAL INJURY RESILIENCE ASSESSMENT

http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/sites/default/files/pdfs/assessment-tools/physical-injury-resilience-assessment.pdf

 

Algorithm Total = 71 – 88 High Resilience Total = 50 – 70 Moderate Resilience Total = 0 – 49 Low Resilience

 

Reference: Johnson, D. C., Polusny, M .A., Erbes, C. R., King, D., King, L., Litz, B. T., Schnurr, P., Friedman, M. and Southwick, S. M. (2008). Resilience and Response to Stress: Development and Initial Validation of the Response to Stressful Experiences Scale (RSES). Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Marine Corps Combat and Operational Stress Control (MCCOSC) Conference, San Diego, CA. Scale Description: The RSES is a 22-item scale emphasizing coping processes. It was developed by the National Center for PTSD and was validated using active duty and reserve component military samples (N = 1059). Used here with a slight modification to instructions.

INSTITUTE FOR FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE MEAL PLAN AND TOXIC EXPOSURE BIBLIOGRAPHIES

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1M7VAFo8wdu4CYnRbiYYuzwG_s1ELvdKJ

COACH'S EYE GAIT ASSESSMENT & BIOMECHANICS ASSESSMENT

https://www.coachseye.com/

 

FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN

https://www.rehabeducation.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Functional-Movement-Assessment.pdf

 

POSTURAL ASSESSMENT

https://www.postureanalysis.com/posturescreen-posture-movement-body-composition-analysis-assessment/

 

EXOS PERFORMANCE QUOTIENT

https://www.teamexos.com/performance-assessments/